Platforms

The platform defines a standard around which a system can be developed. Once the platform has been defined, software developers can produce appropriate software and managers can purchase appropriate hardware and applications. The term is often used as a synonym of operating system. The term cross-platform refers to applications, formats, or devices that work on different platforms. For example, a cross-platform programming environment enables a programmer to develop programs for many platforms at once. A platform is a crucial element in software development. A platform might be simply defined as a place to launch software. The platform provider offers the software developer an undertaking that logic code will run consistently as long as the platform is running on top of other platforms. Logic code includes bytecode, source code, and machine code. It actually means execution of the program is not restricted by the type of operating system provided.


Operating system examples

  • AmigaOS, AmigaOS 4
  • FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD
  • Linux
  • Mac OS
  • Microsoft Windows
  • OS/2
  • Solaris
  • Unix
  • VM


  • Mobile

  • Android
  • Bada
  • Symbian

  • BlackBerry OS
  • iOS
  • Embedded Linux
  • Palm OS
  • Symbian
  • WebOS
  • Windows Mobile
  • Windows Phone

  • Software frameworks

    Main article: Software framework
  • Adobe AIR
  • Adobe Flash
  • Adobe Shockwave
  • Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless (BREW)
  • Java platform
  • java

  • Java Platform, Micro Edition
  • Java Platform, Standard Edition
  • Java Platform, Enterprise Edition
  • JavaFX
  • JavaFX Mobile
  • Microsoft XNA
  • Mono
  • Mozilla Prism, XUL and XULRunner
  • .NET Framework
  • Silverlight
  • Oracle Database
  • Qt
  • Smartface
  • Vexi