Google AdWords:

Google AdWords is Google’s main advertising product and main source of revenue. Google’s total advertising revenues were USD$42.5 billion in 2012. AdWords offers pay-per-click, that is, cost-per-click (CPC) advertising, cost-per-thousand-impressions or cost-per-mille (CPM) advertising, and site-targeted advertising for text, banner, and rich-media ads. The AdWords program includes local, national, and international distribution. Google’s text advertisements are short, consisting of one headline of 25 characters and two additional text lines of 35 characters each. Image ads can be one of several different Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) standard sizes. Sales and support for Google’s AdWords division in the United States is based in Mountain View, California, with major secondary offices in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the company’s second largest office is located in New York. The third-largest US facility is in Mountain View, California, headquarters. Engineering for Google AdWords is based in Mountain View, California.

AdWords features: IP address exclusion In addition to controlling ad placements through location and language targeting, placements can be refined with Internet Protocol (IP) address exclusion. This feature enables advertisers to exclude specify IP address ranges where they don’t want their ads to appear. Up to 100 IP addresses, or ranges of addresses, can be excluded per campaign. All ads in the campaign are prevented from showing for users with the IP addresses specified. Location-based exclusion is also offered as a method of narrowing targeted users. Frequency capping Frequency capping limits the number of times ads appear to the same unique user on the Google Content Network. It doesn’t apply to the Search Network. If frequency capping is enabled for a campaign, a limit must be specified as to the number of impressions allowed per day, week, or month for an individual user. The cap can be configured to apply to each ad, ad group, or campaign.

Technology: The AdWords system was initially implemented on top of the MySQL database engine. After the system had been launched, management decided to use Oracle instead. The system became much slower, so eventually it was returned to MySQL [1]. The interface has also been revamped to offer better work flow with additional new features, such as Spreadsheet Editing, Search Query Reports, and better conversion metrics.

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An introduction to Google AdWords